Weekly Roundup

Trenton Doyle Hancock. Plate of Shrimp, 2012. Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan Gallery.

Trenton Doyle Hancock. “Plate of Shrimp,” 2012. Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan Gallery.

In this week’s roundup, Trenton Doyle Hancock’s work is featured in the magazine Beautiful/Decay, Cindy Sherman is at the Walker Art Center, El Anatsui is in the U.S., Mel Chin asks for “fundreds,” and more.

  • Trenton Doyle Hancock‘s …And Then It All Came Back To Me is at the James Cohan Gallery (NYC). The solo exhibition consists of new paintings that expand on metaphysical interpretations of the artist’s dreams, the invented symbolic language that has long been a hallmark of Hancock’s work, and most notably on the idea of self-portraiture as an exploration of the artist-as-archetype. The show closes December 22.
  • Charles Atlas‘s film, Turning, recently premiered at DOC NYC. Part performance film and part backstage portrait, the film is a collaboration between Atlas and singer/musician Antony Hegarty (of Antony and the Johnsons). It blends Atlas’ visuals, Antony’s music, and interviews with thirteen women (some of whom are transgendered), who perform themselves on a revolving platform while being filmed for “live portraits.” Read an article about this film here.
  • Cindy Sherman is at the Walker Art Center (Minneapolis). The show features 160 photographs by Cindy Sherman and traces the artist’s career from the mid-1970s to the present. It covers dominant themes such as artifice and fiction; cinema and performance; gender and class; horror and the grotesque; and myth, carnival, and fairy tale. The exhibition is on view through February 17, 2013.
  • Mel Chin, currently an Artist in Residence at McColl Center for Visual Art, will speak in McKnight Hall on the University of North Carolina Charlotte campus on November 29 at 12:30 pm. His talk, For a Few Dollars More, will address a variety of recent work and the value and intentions behind them. Admission to the talk is free; the donation of one “fundred” is requested.

  • Cao Fei‘s Shadow Life is on view in the Video Room at The Centre for Contemporary Art, Ujazdowski Castle (Warsaw, Poland). The title refers to Chinese shadow puppet theatre, a tradition she combined with the involvement of actors animating characters with their hands as well as the elements of scenography. The artist evokes in them memories from her own childhood, folk tales, and a televised celebration of the Chinese Spring Festival Gala. The show is on view until November 25.
  • El Anatsui‘s Broken Bridge II was recently installed and is hanging from an exterior wall next to the High Line (NYC) between West 21st and West 22nd Street. This work is made of recycled pressed tin and mirrors woven together in a stunning visual of wave-like patterns and folds that evoke traditional practices of tapestry weaving, while reflecting the surrounding landscape. This work will be on view from November 19, 2012 through Summer 2013.
  • Gabriel Orozco: Asterisms is on view at the Guggenheim Museum (NY). The show is a two-part sculptural and photographic installation by Gabriel Orozco comprising thousands of items of detritus he gathered at a playing field near his NY home and a protected coastal biosphere in Baja California Sur, Mexico, which is also the repository for flows of industrial and commercial waste from across the Pacific Ocean. The exhibition runs through January 13, 2013.
  • Collier Schorr has been invited to Bottega Veneta’s Art of Collaboration cruise campaign, debuting in the December issues of several international fashion magazines. The images reflect Schorr’s signature introspective style, which mixes realism and fantasy to impact the observer.
  • Barry McGee was commissioned by Cadillac to paint a mural, Untitled 2012. The mural was installed on an exterior wall of the Mark Morris Dance Center (NY) and is showcased in a six-page custom advertising portfolio that appears in the December issue of Vanity FairVanity Fair produced a short, documentary-style, behind-the-scenes video of the project that can be viewed here.

Contributor
Nettrice Gaskins is an artist, educator, and member of the vibrant community of practitioner/theorists in the Digital Media PhD program at Georgia Tech. Gaskins compiles Art21's "Weekly Roundup."

Leave a Comment

*