Weekly Roundup

Ai Weiwei. "Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn," 1995. Photo by Melina Mara for The Washington Post. Courtesy the artist and the Newseum.

Ai Weiwei. “Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn,” 1995. Photo by Melina Mara for the Washington Post. Courtesy the artist and the Newseum.

In this week’s roundup, Ai Weiwei’s work is part of the celebration of the U.S. Presidential Inauguration, Trenton Doyle Hancock wins the Greenfield Prize, several artists participate in group shows and lectures, and much more.

  • Ai Weiwei‘s work was projected on the facade of the Newseum (Washington, D.C.) during Presidential Inauguration weekend. The outdoor installation included Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn and quotations about freedom.

  • Trenton Doyle Hancock has won the 2013 Greenfield Prize from the Hermitage Artist Retreat. The Greenfield Prize rotates among theater, visual art, and music disciplines. Hancock will have two years to produce a work of art to be exhibited at the Ringling Museum of Art (Sarasota, FL).
  • Robert Ryman is in a group show at the Wade Wilson Gallery (Houston, TX). The Illusion of the Precise is an exploration of the conversation between the language of line and the language of space, and the emotive and aesthetic responses the dialogue elicits. The exhibition brings a curated selection of works from each artist to explore their breadth of possibility. The show closes February 2.
  • William Wegman: The Traveler will be at the Westport Arts Center (Westport, CT). The exhibition will feature a collection of postcard paintings, drawings, Polaroids, and video, illustrating William Wegman’s work with found images. Works date from the mid-1980s to the present with new paintings on view for the first time. This show continues through March 24. An opening reception will be held on January 25 at 6:30 pm; it is free and open to the public.

  • Mary Heilmann was interviewed for the Hyperallergic blog. In Wild, Punk and Slightly Off-Kilter Heilmann discusses her work that straddles the space between “Pop, Minimalism, abstraction and craft, and has been extremely influential to succeeding generations of artists.”
  • El Anatsui‘s largest installation to date was commissioned specially for the High Line (NYC). Broken Bridge II was created using recycled pressed tins, which have been overlaid and contrasted with mirror panels. The work is on view through summer 2013.
  • Barry McGee was featured in a video for Cadillac’s Art in the Streets. Produced by Vanity Fair Magazine, the video follows the artist as he creates a mural at the Mark Morris Dance Center (Brooklyn, NY).

  • Louise Bourgeois has been honored by the Museum of Modern Art (NYC). The museum launched Louise Bourgeois: The Complete Prints & Books, a major website documenting Bourgeois’s extensive work in printmaking. This site offers a range of innovative, interactive approaches to the artist’s work, including the ability to examine her creative process, and place her prints and illustrated books within the broader context of her sculpture and drawings.
  • Kerry James Marshall presented a lecture, titled Image is Everything, in celebration of the Birmingham Museum of Art’s recent acquisition of his painting School of Beauty, School of Culture.

Contributor
Nettrice Gaskins is an artist, educator, and member of the vibrant community of practitioner/theorists in the Digital Media PhD program at Georgia Tech. Gaskins compiles the Magazine's "Weekly Roundup."
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