Weekly Roundup

Mike Kelley, Deodorized Central Mass with Satellites, 1991/1999. Plush toys sewn over wood and wire frames with styrofoam packing material, nylon rope, pulleys, steel hardware and hanging plates, fiberglass, car paint, and disinfectant. Overall dimensions variable. (c) Estate of Mike Kelley. Courtesy Perry Rubenstein Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Joshua White/JWPictures.com.

Mike Kelley, Deodorized Central Mass with Satellites, 1991/1999. Plush toys sewn over wood and wire frames with styrofoam packing material, nylon rope, pulleys, steel hardware and hanging plates, fiberglass, car paint, and disinfectant. Overall dimensions variable. (c) Estate of Mike Kelley. Courtesy Perry Rubenstein Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Joshua White/JWPictures.com.

Mike Kelley’s retrospective travels to New York City, Hiroshi Sugimoto is given carte blanche in Paris, Laurie Anderson is omnipresent in Austin, and lots more in this week’s roundup.

  • Mike Kelley’s traveling retrospective is headed to MoMA PS1 (Queens, New York). Displaying over two hundred objects and installations, this is the largest exhibition of Kelley’s artwork to-date and it will occupy the entire museum. On view October 13-February 2, 2014. Visit MoMA PS1′s website for a list of related events.
  • Given carte blanche in the Fondation Pierre Bergé/Yves Saint Laurent exhibition space (Paris, France), Hiroshi Sugimoto has installed his own artwork alongside antique masterpieces from his personal collection. Works on view include a video for which the artist employed an acceleration process that makes viewers see the one thousand Bodhisattva of Sanjûsangendo figures multiply into one million. Accelerated Buddha closes January 26, 2014.
  • Robert Faires of the Austin Chronicle interviewed Laurie Anderson whose “name has been popping up in Austin a lot lately.” Laurie Anderson: Landfall is on view at the University of Texas at Austin’s College of Fine Arts through December 7. Laurie Anderson and the Kronos Quartet will perform Landfall at the University’s Performing Arts Center on October 16. And A Conversation with Laurie Anderson, moderated by professor Mike Smith, will take place in the University’s Bass Concert Hall Lobby on October 17.
  • Allan McCollum collaborated with fellow Art21 artist Andrea Zittel on the project Plaster Surrogates Colored and Organized by Andrea Zittel, now on view at Petzel Gallery (New York, New York). Where McCollum and his assistants produced the Surrogates, Zittel selected the color for each. The project “marks a new foray into a communal artist practice where two artists and friends challenge the conceptions of mass production using handmade objects and distinct aesthetic and organizational choices.” Closes October 12.
  • The Frey Foundation recognized Maya Lin’s 2001 design Ecliptic (Grand Rapids, Michigan) by installing a twelve-foot-long black granite marker at the site. The marker explains the inspiration for Ecliptic and also accommodates public seating. Read more about it at Mlive.com.
  • Kiki Smith is the artist-in-residence at the University of North Texas’s Institute for the Advancement of the Arts. During her residency, which spans the 2013-14 academic year, Smith will make a new large-scale print and exhibit her artwork at UNT on the Square.
  • Ai Weiwei designed three skateboard decks for Sk8room, using graphics from his installations He Xie (2011), Sunflower Seeds (2010), and his film Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry (2012). All proceeds go to Skateistan, a non-profit NGO that supports youth through skateboarding and educational activities.
  • Jeff Koons collaborated with Lady Gaga on the cover for her new album “Artpop,” to be released on November 11. Read more about it in the October issue of Elle, on newsstands now.

Contributor
Nettrice Gaskins is an artist, educator, and member of the vibrant community of practitioner/theorists in the Digital Media PhD program at Georgia Tech. Gaskins compiles the Magazine's "Weekly Roundup."

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