Weekly Roundup

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Ai Weiwei, Forever Bicycle, 2013. Courtesy the artist and Scotiabank Nuit. Photo © Ryan Davey.

In this week’s roundup Ai Weiwei mounts 3,144 bicycles, Marina Abramović installs her version of The Scream, Alfredo Jaar creates a symphony of crying babies, and more.

  • A new edition of Ai Weiwei’s installation Forever Bicycle (2011) is on view in Nathan Phillips Square (Toronto, Canada) through October 27. Commissioned in conjunction with Nuit BlancheForever Bicycle features 3,144 interconnected bicycles that form a three-dimensional structure, creating a visual effect of colorful illumination at night. The sculpture was constructed using frames from Yong Jiu, China’s most common bicycle brand.
  • Through Darkest America by Truck and Tank, a major exhibition of new works by Mark Bradford, is on view at White Cube Bermondsey (London, United Kingdom). Bradford has used materials found in the urban environment—such as billboard sheets, posters, and newsprint—and collaged them into paintings that explore the dynamics of social abstraction. Closes December 22.
  • James Turrell, Louise Bourgeois, and Marina Abramović all have work in the newly opened Ekeberg Park (Oslo, Norway), which was the setting for Edvard Munch’s painting The Scream. One of Turrell’s skyspaces and Bourgeois’s hanging sculpture The Couple are installed along with Abramović’s video of people screaming in the same spot that inspired Munch.
  • Laylah Ali: The Greenheads Series is on display in the Bartels Gallery of the Johnson Museum (Ithaca, New York). The exhibition features more than eighty of Ali’s paintings of strange green-headed beings of indeterminate age, gender, race, and meaning. Closes December 22.
  • Alfredo Jaar‘s audio piece Music (Everything I know I learned the day my son was born) is being installed in a specially designed outdoor pavilion at the Nasher Sculpture Center (Dallas, Texas). Visitors entering the pavilion will hear recordings of the first cries of babies born in Dallas between October 1, 2013 and February 1, 2014. Music is part of the Nasher’s ten-year anniversary project, which opens October 19.

Contributor
Nettrice Gaskins is an artist, educator, and member of the vibrant community of practitioner/theorists in the Digital Media PhD program at Georgia Tech. Gaskins compiles the Magazine's "Weekly Roundup."

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